3 things that won't exist in professional cycling in 5 years time

1. The breakaway

 Source: http://bit.ly/1TfmzvX (Photo: Graham Watson)

Source: http://bit.ly/1TfmzvX (Photo: Graham Watson)

As the science in cycling continues to progress the advances in race management strategies will continue to improve. This improvement will become so data driven that races will always be decided by a bunched sprint. Breakaways will always be swallowed by the peloton before the end because SDs will be able to overlay years of data onto the road in front and tell their team exact the speed and cadence they should be delivering at exactly that part of the road. This 'perfect form' will develop to an extent that any breakaway will always have to ride in the red to advance and make gains.

Think of how Merckx used to break away from the start and finished upwards of 10mins ahead of the chasing pack. The last memorable break away was when Jack Bauer stayed out for 220km on stage 15 at the 2014 tour to be swallowed in the final metres and finish 10th. The largest margin of victory in the 2015 TdF was Stage 11 where Rodriguez beat Dan Martin by 1:12. At the 2014 TdF there were 3 stages where the winner held more than a minute over his pursuers with Tony Martin's victory over Cancellara in stage 9 the peach at 2:45. The times are a' fallin'

2. Carbon frames

 Source: http://bit.ly/1TLsfLk

Source: http://bit.ly/1TLsfLk

Science will bring better solutions to the the market meaning strong, lighter and more aerodynamic constructions ushering in the demise of brittle carbon for materials such as graphene composites that will drive advancements in the sport to such an extent that bikes may have to have downforce applied to ensure that are stable when in the wet or when descending.

3. Cycle computers

The addition of a Garmin to the road bike has become a prerequisite in the modern age of cycling and the peloton sees them as essential race management and planning. This fixed computer will no longer exist by 2020 as technology will bring either a head-up display a la Google Glass or an in-built handlebar display brought about by super-conducting graphene. This display could show the riders performance Vs last year's stage winner, for instance, and provide information on the location of team mates in the peloton for better implementation of race strategies.

I'm sure there are others. I'm sure I might be out by a few years but these 3 will change professional cycling significantly and it will be interesting to see where cycling goes as the sport evolves and riders adapt to technological developments.